Madison Dresser v2

May 18, 2013

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This low, wide chest adds to my series of reclaimed redwood bedroom furniture.  The salvaged material is distinct for the dark streaks that run through its otherwise clean, straight grain.  Solid maple, dovetailed drawer boxes.  Concealed, soft close slides.  As pictured th piece is 20″ deep x 34″ tall x 60″ wide.  Custom dimensions are available. Contact me at reasonmodern@gmail.com

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Ply Bar Stools

July 1, 2012

True to my original Ply Chairs, this set of stools was made out of bits of plywood saved from the scrap pile.  This time we added color on top of what was already there to create a custom distressed color block effect.  This was delivered as a mixed set, but matching color sets are also available.

Madison Dresser

February 5, 2012

This solid reclaimed redwood case is fitted with extra large, solid maple dovetailed drawer boxes. Each drawer is 40″ wide x 10″ tall x 18″ deep, and the heavy duty hardware allows them to glide easily to full extension.  It’s big, but the flush inset drawer fronts, flat panels and lack of protruding hardware help the piece carry itself with grace.

Martin Table

January 19, 2012

We didn’t want the legs of this table to disappear under the large reclaimed wood top, nor did we want more obstruction to leg room than was necessary.  Instead of using steel bar or tube, we achieved  volume by designing with heavy gauge sheetmetal, bent and formed to a custom profile.  The result anchors the space without feeling too heavy. The top is made of floor joists salvaged from a renovation at my shop.

 

Atlantic Shelving

October 23, 2011

Add storage and display space, check.  Accentuate the height of the room, check.   Maintain a free-hanging look, check. Integrate the television and media components, check.  Hide cords, check.   Come in on budget, check…

The Atlantic Shelving and Media System accomplishes all these goals through simplicity.  The materials are modest: blackened steel brackets and reclaimed douglas fir planking, and the forms are basic.  Careful attention to proportions and spacing allow an amazing amount of functionality to complete the room rather than clutter it.  The media cabinet is fit with a heavy duty, full extension shelf that allows easy access to the components’ cables while keeping the tangle out of sight.

Clark Table

August 7, 2011

This table’s variations on traditional form make it subtly modern.  A single beam supports the length of the top rather than a traditional apron, and the diagonal taper of the legs lightens the piece while gently defying its farmhouse origins. It was born of NYC construction salvage: douglas fir floor joists milled to show fresh new faces.  Dark amber stain provides a big head start towards the fir’s natural color after decades of darkening.

Much of the old growth douglas fir in this dining set is likely on it’s third life.  It was salvaged it from the remodel of a stately 1908 residence in Laurel Heights.  I noticed right away that the individual 3×4 boards had different blade patterns on their rough-sawn surfaces, suggesting that they originated came from multiple different lumber mills.

This peculiarity came up in a conversation with a craftsman quite a few years my senior.  He pointed out that after the 1906 earthquake builders often used material reclaimed from the wreckage, explaining why studs from a single wall would come from multiple different sources.

REASON is proud to follow in the footsteps of resourceful builders who invested the time to reuse this beautiful material.  As a 3rd Generation piece of San Francisco history these pieces are now poised to become the social center of a beautiful apartment in SOMA.