Industry Shelving

March 3, 2012

Heavy duty shelving made of salvaged water tank cedar and blackened steel.  This design can be fabricated in just about any size and with your choice of wood.  The steel corner design would allow this piece to be even taller, wider and deeper than you see here without so much as a wobble.  Thanks to Evan the Intern (seen polishing above) for all his help over the past few weeks.

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Martin Table

January 19, 2012

We didn’t want the legs of this table to disappear under the large reclaimed wood top, nor did we want more obstruction to leg room than was necessary.  Instead of using steel bar or tube, we achieved  volume by designing with heavy gauge sheetmetal, bent and formed to a custom profile.  The result anchors the space without feeling too heavy. The top is made of floor joists salvaged from a renovation at my shop.

 

Much of the old growth douglas fir in this dining set is likely on it’s third life.  It was salvaged it from the remodel of a stately 1908 residence in Laurel Heights.  I noticed right away that the individual 3×4 boards had different blade patterns on their rough-sawn surfaces, suggesting that they originated came from multiple different lumber mills.

This peculiarity came up in a conversation with a craftsman quite a few years my senior.  He pointed out that after the 1906 earthquake builders often used material reclaimed from the wreckage, explaining why studs from a single wall would come from multiple different sources.

REASON is proud to follow in the footsteps of resourceful builders who invested the time to reuse this beautiful material.  As a 3rd Generation piece of San Francisco history these pieces are now poised to become the social center of a beautiful apartment in SOMA.